Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Author Interview - James L. Rubart, Author of Rooms - Part 2

Welcome back to Part 2 of our interview with James L. Rubart, best-selling author of ROOMS.

3) Developing characters requires great skill. You did an awesome job with all of them, but especially Micah. Do you have some insights and tips for our readers on how to create realistic people?

Base 'em on real people, then amp up the distinguishing characteristics. Micah is a combination of three different people, all with strong personalities. By taking parts of each person and mixing them together it made the Micah Taylor of ROOMS come out more distinct than if it was just one person I knew. And here's the cool thing: People don't see themselves in a novel. There's a famous story about a very unsavory woman, who was a main character in a novel. She came up to the author at a book signing and said, "I can't stand that woman!" I have a sweatshirt my wife bought me that says, "Careful, or you'll end up in my novel." It's true!

4) I'm assuming your genre is Christian Speculative Fiction. (Please correct me if I'm wrong.) Did you and your agent have a difficult time convincing publishers to take on your book? Do you feel the success of The Shack made them more open-minded toward Rooms? I'd like to hear about your journey to publication.

Great question! Yes, I think The Shack definitely opened B&H's mind, and yes, we did have a rough time convincing people to take a chance on ROOMS.

When ROOMS was first shopped to publishers in the fall of 2006, it was rejected by everyone. Most publishers said, "The guy can write, but he's unknown and we're not exactly sure where the book fits." It doesn't fit neatly into a pre-defined genre. When The Shack started to get traction, the folks at B&H read it, liked it, and saw the similarities between ROOMS and The Shack. David Webb (who was the executive director of fiction at B&H in 2006) loved ROOMS but said they couldn't take it on at that time. But he said if it didn't sell in six months to bring it back to him.

A year later, I sat down with him to talk about my next novel, BOOK OF DAYS, and he asked about ROOMS. He said he'd read 200 manuscripts since he read ROOMS and couldn't get it out of his mind. So David and I took another run at it and B&H offered me a deal on June 23, 2008.

Wow! What a great story and what an encouragement to those of us whose books don't fit into "a pre-defined genre." In our final installment next week, Jim will discuss the message of his book and his future offerings.

Question for Writers: Do you write in a well-defined genre or does your manuscript defy existing labels? How are you approaching agents and editors if the latter scenario fits your book?

Question for Readers: Are you open to books that are a little out of the ordinary? Note that Jim's book includes an element of romance. Does that pique your interest?

18 comments:

Heather Sunseri said...

I've always felt that in order to break into the industry with fiction, I would need to think outside the box, high-concept. But writers walk a fine line between creating something new and fresh AND fitting in with what's already out there.

Thanks Susan and Jim. I have Jim's book on my to-purchase list. I'm thinking an Amazon order is in my future.

Jessica Nelson said...

That an awesome call story!!!
And yes, if a book doesn't have romance, I'm not interested usually, but if it has romance, the genre never matters because that romance thread will usually hook me.

Lynn said...

I do like books a 'out of the ordinary.' It keeps me hopeful that we are always creating, thinking beyond borders. Speculative fiction and paranormal are genres I see amoungst my peers, but I do not write either, but still hopeful there may be a market for my writing. I'm inspired by Jim's tenacity! I loved the first interview and found part 2 even better. Thanks Susan.

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Heather -

You're welcome!

I understand your predicament. My manuscripts are "outside the box."

Blessings,
Susan :)

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Jess -

I like at least a thread of romance too. :)

Blessings,
Susan

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Lynn -

The minute I read Jim's book, I knew I wanted to interview him. He's a fascinating guy.

Blessings,
Susan :)

Shopgirl said...

Great post, I've seen some people on blogsphere who can really write but are discouraged by genre definitions and don't want to pursue publications. I know they need to get over it but I do think genre categorization could use some update too.

Janna Qualman said...

I think there is much to be learned by the extraordinary. :)

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Shopgirl -

Publishers take a huge risk, especially when taking on a new author. They're more comfortable if the genre is selling well.

Blessings,
Susan :)

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Janna -

I agree. Jim's book had me on the edge of my seat because I had no idea what would occur next.

Blessings,
Susan :)

quietspirit said...

Susan and Jim:
Thank you for this information about chararcter building. I found it enlightening.
I started to work on a story this week. I prefer recognizable genres. This new one of mine is a Christian story but I can't be more specific at this time.

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Quiet Spirit -

How exciting that you're starting a new story! Jim's tips on characters helped me as well. :)

Blessings,
Susan

Stephen Tremp said...

I think its important to incorprate sub genres into your main genre. As more writers take the self publishing road I think its important to reach as many audiences as possible. And adding romace is a real no-brainer. Nice to meet you, James.

Carla Gade said...

With some of my colonial fiction writing peers we are trying to build enthusiasm for the sub-genre. Not an easy thing to do, but its gaining momentum.

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Stephen -

Thanks for your comments. Mostly everyone likes a touch of romance. :)

Blessings,
Susan

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Carla -

I love that time period for the richness of its history. Your series on Colonial dress was fantastic!

Blessings,
Susan :)

Faith Imagined said...

I am so glad for this interview! This book sounds really cool! I love books that are out of the ordinary!

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi Alisa -

Stay tuned for the third and final installment of this interview. Jim has more to share.

Blessings,
Susan :)