Monday, May 21, 2018

On My Nightstand - The Sea Before Us by Sarah Sundin

The Sea Before Us by Sarah Sundin, February 6, 2018 from Revell

I've read all of Sarah's books, but I think this one is my favorite. The combination of a British and American perspective for planning the Normandy invasion brought a whole new appreciation for the difficulties the allies faced. The cultural nuances and the personal relationships all filtered through the characters' faith and life experiences.

Dorothy Fairfax, daughter of a well-to-do businessman and an officer in the British Wrens, takes her duties seriously. At the same time, she's dealing with the loss of her mother and brothers to the war and her father's depression. She thinks she knows what she wants - Lawrence - and tries to be the kind of woman he would find attractive.

Wyatt Paxton, an American from Texas, has exiled himself from his family due to past sins. He knows God's forgiven him, but he can't forgive himself. When he meets the pretty British officer, he keeps it on a friendship level. Why get involved in another relationship fiasco?

This story had such depth, and the research was impeccable. I was completely engaged with these characters. It was easy to believe they were real people because of the historical facts wrapped around them.

5 Stars! I recommend this book and all of Sarah Sundin's other series.

Disclaimer: Neither the author nor the publisher paid me for a positive review. I purchased the book, and all opinions expressed are mine and mine alone.

Writers and Readers: Do you enjoy books that combine different cultural elements? Please share.







Friday, May 18, 2018

POV/Writer's Block/Unborn Babies/Failure Isn't Forever/Recipe

Writer's Block

1.  Point of View presents some sticky problems for writers. As we advance, we can still get caught with challenges in this area. Lisa Hall Wilson writes about 4 Point of View Breaks that Sneak In Even When You Know Better.

2.  Jane Anne Staw guest posts at Jane Friedman's blog on the subject of defeating writer's block. I've been struggling with my Work in Progress. I picked up several important tips from this article.

3.  Christian Headlines reports that Indiana's governor has signed a bill stating that unborn babies are persons. A criminal can now be charged with murder if a pregnant woman is attacked and she loses her unborn child.

4.  Andy Lee guest posts at The Write Conversation on "Failure is Not Forever." Whether or not you're a writer, this post applies to all of us.

5.  Melissa Lester shares a simple French Country Salad on her blog. It looks like a refreshing dish for a spring/summer lunch.

Writers:  Do you ever suffer from writer's block? How do you overcome it?

Readers:  Which link was your favor this week and why?

Photo Credit:  John Olsson



Monday, May 14, 2018

On My Nightstand - Until We Find Home by Cathy Gohlke

Until We Find Home by [Gohlke, Cathy]


Another great story by this author! I never get tired of her books. This one focuses on a group of orphans smuggled out of France and Nazi Germany during the Second World War.

Claire Stewart, an aspiring writer, helps the French Resistance rescue Jewish youngsters. She plans to drop them off at a boat that will take them to England. Her contact and boyfriend, Arnaud, is supposed to meet her there, but never shows up. She gets knocked unconscious and ends up in England with the children. Fortunately, her aunt, Lady Miranda, lives there and takes them all into her home even though she has her doubts.

David Campbell is displaced in his own right. An American working in England on a top-secret war project, he finds lodging with Lady Miranda, Claire, and the young refugees. His wisdom and concern for all of them brings growth, joy, and hope to the household.

This book is 5 Stars all the way. Any time I see a new story coming out by this author, I make sure I pick it up. I've read every single one she's written and keep them in my personal library.

Writers and Readers:  Do you have some go-to authors that always top your TBR list? Please share.



Friday, May 11, 2018

Productive/Character Feelings/Abuse Prevention/Movies/Devo/Decluttering Myths


1.  Writers can be productive and happy while authoring. Cathy Fyock posts at The Write Conversation and gives some excellent advice to help you finish your book.

2.  Showing rather than telling how characters feel is the aim of Zoe M. McCarthy's blog post for writers. Take your writing up a notch with these excellent tips.

3.  Christian movies are exploding in popularity. I recently saw I Can Only Imagine and came away inspired and uplifted. Christian Headlines has a fascinating article on this trend. I hope you enjoy it.

4. Lynn J. Simpson talks about securing our steps. We all face hard times, but when we focus on God, He leads us through them.

5. Realtor.com had an interesting post on decluttering myths. Following this list will set you up for failure. The author gives advice that will help you keep your home clutter free.

Writers and Readers:  Have you seen any of the recent faith-based movies? Which ones did you see and how did you like them?

Photo Credit:  Jonathan Werner


Monday, May 7, 2018

On My Kindle - Write Your Novel From the Middle by James Scott Bell

Write Your Novel From The Middle: A New Approach for Plotters, Pantsers and Everyone in Between


When I read the blurb on this book, it piqued my interest because it said it applied to plotters, pantsers, and tweeners. Mr. Bell generally espouses plotting, which puts my brain in a knot.

Often, I find craft books dull and boring, but Mr. Bell added a nice dash of humor to his text. It held my attention and kept me turning pages.

The main theme of the book was discovering the protagonist's "mirror moment." This occurs in the middle of the story. I put this to the test with a book I'm currently reading by a Christy Award winning author, and sure enough, there was the moment right where he said it would be.

I'm experimenting with his technique with my work in progress. Maybe it will help me break out of writer's block.

This craft book gets 5 Stars for being interesting and informative.

Writers:  Do you use a particular method to structure your stories? Please share.

Readers:  What's the best part of a story for you? The beginning, the journey, or the grand finale? Please share your thoughts.


Friday, May 4, 2018

Love Language/Deep POV/Downs Syndrome/Rest/One-Touch Rule




1. DiAnn Mills guest posts at The Write Conversation. She asks, "What is your character's love language?"

2.  Lisa Hall-Wilson guest posts at Writers in the Storm about 5 Quick Ways to Shift Description and POV into  Deep Point of View. There's also a link to a free e-course. I've asked for it, and will give you a report when I've finished.

3.  Bravo to the State of Utah House for passing a bill that outlaws the aborting of Downs Syndrome babies. There is much pressure from the medical community and society to destroy children with disabilities. The bill still must pass the Utah Senate.

4.  Lucinda Seacrest McDowell guest posts at The Write Conversation and urges writers to embrace the rest they need. This advice applies to any one involved in a creative endeavor.

5.  Okay, so I'm on a declutter kick. I just heard about the "One Touch Rule." Yeah, it piqued my curiosity too.

Writers:  Have you taken any free e-courses on writing? Please share.

Readers:  How do you rest/re-charge?

Photo Credit: Patataj Patataj